Resident Evil

Resident Evil

Capcom takes a chance on a new IP and creates one of the best new games of our time.

Ridged Plastic Long Box Ridged Plastic Long Box

Genre:
Survival Horror
CDs: 1
(?? Megs)
Players:
1 Player
ESRB: Mature
Animated Blood & Gore
Animated Violence
Publisher:
Capcom
Retail Barcode:
0 13388 21010 7
Memory:
1 Block
Developer:
Capcom
Sony ID:
SLUS-00170
Accessories:
Analog, Vibration
Released:
March 30, 1996
PSRM:
001660

You’re Dead Scared – Face Your Fear!

A series of gory attacks in the area surrounding a remote biotech lab brings in S.T.A.R.S (Special Tactics and Rescue Squad) to investigate. On arrival, Bravo Team communications are abruptly cut off. Now it’s up to your team.

You arrive at the isolated mansion under-powered and on the run. Arm yourself with anything you can find; knives, pistols, shotguns, flame throwers – search for hidden rounds to stay alive!

There are puzzles to solve, traps to disarm and mysteries to uncover while trying to avoid a blood-bath with the freaks of nature that populate the mansion. Each lurking horror you survive will bring you closer to the source of the Resident Evil.

  • Unprecedented detail-intense texture maps, shadows, and lighting effects
  • Unique camera angles, action perspectives, and realistic polygon character graphics
  • Face unstoppable zombies, monstrous spiders, mutated snakes and other unknown horrors.
  • Explore hundreds of rooms in the gigantic mansion, secret underground lairs, the garden, graveyard and guest houses to solve mind-bending mysteries and discover fascinating secrets.
  • Ominous digital surround soundtrack adds to the rich and evil 3-D environment
  • Choose which soldier to play: each creates their own graphic adventure.

Review

Welcome to the game that launched a thousand horror ships and introduced the video game industry to one of the sneakiest graphical tricks ever discovered in gaming history.

Resident Evil really doesn’t need any introduction; it’s one of Capcom’s most profitable and famous franchises since Street Fighter 2 first took over the arcades. Having spawned enough sequels, spin-offs, and cameo appearances in other games to fill an entire strategy guide, you’d be hard pressed to find someone who doesn’t know about the series.

While the true origins of the Raccoon Mansion were explained in the prequel Resident Evil 0, the action in this title happens after a team of S.T.A.R.S (Special Tactics and Rescue Squad) disappears while investigating the mansion. Now a second team, led by Albert Wesker, with members Chris Redfield and Jill Valentine must use their wits to out gun, out run, and out solve every puzzle the mansion can throw at them.

Capcom’s graphical solution of creating ‘flat’ CG rendered backgrounds allowed them to poor more polygons into the characters, producing a gorgeous looking cast of zombies and troops. This trick would be used by quite a few other companies throughout the PlayStation’s life, and Capcom carried over the tradition with their PS2 series Onimusha.

Ironically, this landmark of a game hasn’t really aged well in its original form; I found myself cracking up at the absurdly bad B-Movie style dialogue in ways I never did back in its original release. If you’ve never played a Resident Evil game, go snag a Game Cube and the re-released Resident Evil GC. It’s a frightful good time.

Media

There are no Images for this game yet.

There are no Ads for this game yet.

Variants

Jewel Case Release Jewel Case Release

Trivia

  • Resident Evil gained a ‘Director’s Cut’ release that added a few things as well as changed a few things to the main game. Curiously, this caused the original hit to be shunned from the Greatest Hits release catalog. The updated Director’s Cut takes it’s place among the green.
  • In one of the most eye brow raising situations, Resident Evil 1 first got the above ‘Director’s Cut’, but then got re-developed into the high-resolution, modern day graphics version for the Nintendo Game Cube. Years after, that version got remastered for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.
  • Resident Evil is the only game in the entire series to have a ‘happy ending’. That is, that the story actually has closure and does not elude to a possible sequel or side story element. Capcom wrote that script that way so just in case it did not catch on in popularity, the tale would have been complete.
  • Nintendo bought the rights to all the numerical Resident Evils for their Game Cube system in 2002. RE was completely redone from scratch with no more FMV footage and reworked item layouts and game areas.
  • The series has sold more than 24 Million units worldwide.
  • Released in Japan as Biohazard, the name had to be changed when it came to America because there was a heavy metal band with the same name.
  • There were three FMV clips in the US version that had to be censored before the game could be released in America. One included the opening FMV, the second is the part where you run into the first zombie in the house, and the last is Chris’ ‘Bad’ ending where he is no longer shown lighting up a cigarette.
  • Take a closer look of the cover illustration. The main human character is actually a montage of different parts, including different faces/arms, and his weapon is a fusion of several different pieces. Half of the cover is illustration, half is photography.
  • Capcom admitted the cult classic movie Night of the Living Dead was the inspiration for the game.
  • Also released for the Sega Saturn, which featured different costume choices and an extra mode.
  • Although based on a different script, there were many joke game references featured in the Hollywood Resident Evil movie. One of them being a characters comment of, “I don’t understand, I shot [the zombie] five times!”
  • Jill Valentine’s cameo in Marvel Vs. Capcom 2 pays a huge tribute to RE1. They even have a move where she uses a Herb and the RE life bar comes out to show she’s fine.

The Verdict

8Great

The Good: Excellent ‘spook’ moments | Amazing Replay Value due to Unlockables

The Bad: That…dialogue… | ‘Tank Controls’ take some getting used to